non-fiction-books

Well, the good thing about quarantine y’all is it has gotten many of us, including myself, back into the mode of reading. Now, I am a pretty “modern guy” , but audible and digital books just don’t do it for me. I just like to turn the pages and hold a good book.

With that being said, here are my Top 5 picks for this Summer. I am kinda a history and biography kinda guy with a smattering of thrilling fiction, so my picks might not be to your liking. Feel free to share on our Facebook page a non-fiction book you think everyone should be reading.

5. Yogi: A Life Behind The Mask

by John Pessah. The definitive biography of Yogi Berra, the New York Yankees icon, winner of 10 World Series championships, and the most-quoted player in baseball history.

4. The Splendid and The Vile: A Saga of Churchill, Family, and Defiance

by Eric Larson.

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • The author of The Devil in the White City and Dead Wake delivers a fresh and compelling portrait of Winston Churchill and London during the Blitz

“Churchill’s lessons of resilience and his style of steady-handed leadership are essential to the state of mind of American readers.”—Vanity Fair

3. A Woman Of No Importance

by Sonia Purnell.

A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

Chosen as a BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR by NPR, the New York Public Library, Amazon, the Seattle Times, the Washington Independent Review of Books, PopSugar, the Minneapolis Star Tribune, BookBrowse, the Spectator, and The Times of London.

2. Black Flags, Blue Waters

by Eric Jay Dolin. With surprising tales of vicious mutineers, imperial riches, and high-seas intrigue, Black Flags, Blue Waters vividly reanimates the “Golden Age” of piracy in the Americas.

1. Dodge City

by Tom Clavin.

The instant New York Times bestseller!

Dodge City, Kansas, is a place of legend. The town that started as a small military site exploded with the coming of the railroad, cattle drives, eager miners, settlers, and various entrepreneurs passing through to populate the expanding West. Before long, Dodge City’s streets were lined with saloons and brothels and its populace was thick with gunmen, horse thieves, and desperadoes of every sort. By the 1870s, Dodge City was known as the most violent and turbulent town in the West.

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